Rosemary Lonewolf

Rosemary Lonewolf
Rosemary Lonewolf

Rosemary Apple Blossom Lonewolf was born to Joseph and Theresa Lonewolf in December, 1953. She is also the granddaughter of Camilio Sunflower Tafoya and niece of Grace Medicine Flower. While her tribal affiliation is Santa Clara she grew up mostly in Colorado Springs, Colorado. She attended Fort Lewis College in Durango, Colorado, then went to Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona.

Rosemary was making clay figures as a young child but learned to make pottery the traditional way and to decorate her pots using the sgraffito technique with her father, beginning in 1972. Since beginning her career as a potter, she has won acclaim in both Native American and non-Native art exhibits. She spent some time as an artist-in-residence at Harvard University. She even designed a couple major pedestrian bridges over highways in Phoenix and Tucson.

Rosemary's work has been featured at the National Museum of American History, the Smithsonian Institute, the Heard Museum and the New Mexico Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, among others. She has also been recognized by the Arizona Commission on the Arts.

While Rosemary is well-known for her sgraffito work she has also created some major ceramic installations, including a 30-foot ceramic-and-glass art fence at the Heard Museum with Tony Jojola of Isleta Pueblo.

Sgraffito hummingbird, flower and geometric design on a polychrome seed pot
Polychrome seed pot with sgraffito hummingbird, flower and geometric design
1 1/2 in H by 1 3/4 in Dia
Sgraffito bird, flowering bush and geometric design on a red seed pot
Red seed pot with sgraffito bird, flowering bush and geometric design
1 in H by 1 1/4 in Dia
Sgraffito deer and geometric design on a red seed pot
Red seed pot decorated with a sgraffito deer and geometric design
2 1/2 in H by 2 in Dia
Photo of Rosemary Lonewolf courtesy of
Pottery photos courtesy of Andrea Fisher Fine Pottery