Shapes and Forms: Canteens

A Salado geometric design on a polychrome canteen
A polychrome canteen with a Sikyátki-Revival design painted in the Salado way
by Nampeyo of Hano, Hopi

5.25 in H by 7.75 in Dia
Black geometric design on a marbleized clay canteen
A mixed clay canteen with a black geometric design
by Calvin Analla Jr., Laguna

7.75 in L by 6.5 in W by 5.75 in H
Thunderbird and geometric design on a polychrome canteen
Polychrome canteen decorated with a thunderbird and geometric design
by Jean Sahmie, Hopi

6.25 in H by 6.5 in Dia
Measurement includes stand
Parrot, branch and geometric design on a polychrome canteen
Polychrome canteen decorated with a parrot, branch and geometric design
by Eva Histia, Acoma

13.75 in L by 12.25 in W by 9.25 in H

Traveling cross-country in the desert means one has to carry water, somehow. The container has to be lightweight, needs looped handles for carrying and a small spout that can be closed with a corn cob or stick. That essentially defines the canteen. Because they were made of porous clay, Puebloan canteens also kept their water cool through evaporation through the clay. The advent of a hungry art market brought innovations to canteens, like much more fancy designs.

Roadrunner, rain clouds and geometric design on a polychrome canteen
Polychrome canteen decorated with a roadrunner, rain cloud and geometric design
by Ruby Panana, Zia

5.25 in L by 5 in W by 3.25 in H
Bird and geometric design on a polychrome canteen
Polychrome canteen decorated with a bird and geometric design
by Seferina Bell, Zia

4 in H by 7.25 in Dia
Black canteen with bear paw imprint Bear paw imprint on a black canteen, 2nd Place Santa Fe Indian Market, 1972
by Margaret Tafoya, Santa Clara

7.75 in Dia by 7.25 in H
Leather strap on a micaceous clay canteen
Micaceous clay canteen with a leather strap
by Christine McHorse, Dineh

8.5 in H by 8.5 in Dia

Shapes and Forms